Cold Weather At The Old Folks’ Home

Born and bred in the Northlands doesn’t mean someone must stay in the snow/ice belt, but people do.  Children, of course, need to stay with parents, and children account for a hefty percentage of the population.  Adult population is another matter.  Many stay for the sake of a job and a measure of income, especially if around what’s called “middle-age.”  Only a few are in a good position to leave, which means dealing with the weather.

Zero and sub-zero temperatures (Fahrenheit) are obviously more likely the farther north one goes (or for that matter south in the southern hemisphere).  The area underfoot is In the more temperate area, and “zero” only happen sometimes (right now underfoot).  Since it only happens sometimes, and since the people in an old folks’ home often do not do much like hold down a job, they are among those who often aren’t well prepared.

There’s less going places (never mind hanging around outside congregating regardless of nice selling points like a lovely view) and more of a rush to get in if there’s some need to go out.  And, that “getting in” includes getting beyond the halls, which, especially near the entrances, aren’t much warmer than the outdoors.  Chilly halls also put a damper on necessities, like going to a laundry room or even getting some snacks from machines.

There can be a serious strain on the heating system if it is getting a little old, but if it is a big building there is less chance of something like pipes freezing up or electricity being knocked out for an extended period (especially when a place has a back-up generator). Reasonable older people also try to avoid driving if roadways are bad, so getting things like food or making it to things like doctor’s appointments are very common problems.

To be remembered:  snow covers a lot of dirt.  🙂

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