Dear Readers….

Thank you for stopping by. Readers are the reason for all this stuff. The whole point is to offer things, possibly information, maybe a bit of entertainment or just whatever to or for anyone who might be interested in a line of thought or even some everyday living in this given little place on earth (or some recollections of a couple of other places).

There is much around to discuss, from the autumn-like weather that has happened hereabouts and the holiday today to the Aviation Trail news that has arrived but has yet to be read. Things are happening at the old folks’ home, too, and the world beyond.  (The world beyond can’t get too much space as that tends to become editorializing.)

The situation in this little part of the world has improved some, but with a whole slew of newish and revamped equipment it’s slow going. Learning to use new things (or even adjusted things) take a while. Be assured, it’s being worked on….  Unfortunately, some medical concerns also came into the picture to make things even slower.

Personal stuff has interfered with ordinary essay offerings.  Not only was there a need to head for the hospital emergency room recently (and home care nursing and the like is still in play — indeed, still being organized) ordinary services like food have been disrupted for reasons like people quitting and the holiday.  The medical may take time.

May your week be good.

 

Advertisements

Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park Ohio

       A Dover Wright 5 - Copy

“Dayton Aviation Heritage National Park” is a bit of wordy description to identify the handful of places related some way to the Wright Brothers under the direction of the U.S. National Park Service.  While that does rather say it all, recently it’s such a few places that it probably should be noted that the superintendent also covered another park. 

The superintendent made local news this past week as he is retiring.  Given the plans afoot to include the factory of the Wrights, he seemed to see a bright and growing future, but whether that might soon include purely local authority rather than one also covering a place on the other side of the state wasn’t clear (or else no one bothered to ask). 

At present, since the government authority could cover two parks, Dayton Aviation Heritage stuff is obviously a small part of the U.S. government’s interests.  For that matter, it’s not even a big part of Dayton’s interests for many of the people.  But, it’s important for understanding of what the Wrights actually did.  It’s a good piece of history. 

Decades have passed since this “salvage operation” started out, and not only are some of the promoters old, some have died off already (as has been mentioned).  Materially that bright and growing future won’t be seen by some; and, it’s quite possible it won’t develop as expected.  Nonetheless, diehards will likely continue because it’s good history. 

Doing something worthwhile uplifts the spirit. Thumbs up 

Editorial Gripe — Today’s Aviation, ATI Note

      A Dover Wright 1a

This little space was never meant to be a bunch of endless rambling of personal opinion, but a comment (now and then) should be okay.  This was meant to be a place where people found informative and interesting stuff about a few things around the immediate area of the “author.”  Personal stuff now limits physical roaming but the principle is valid. 

The humble (?) city of Dayton, the birthplace of aviation, the “place” of Aviation Trail and a sometimes reference in this little place, tries to have an annual air show.  That may not be the biggest or the finest in the country (or in the world), but it could be considered a very special show even if it is at the “barely a port” municipal airport. 

The Dayton air show should be nearly perfect.  This year’s show was again marred by an accident.  Luckily, no one was killed, but it was a “Thunderbirds’ accident” and canceled two days of that headline act.  It’s not guaranteed that a show will include either the Navy’s Blue Angels or the Air Force Thunderbirds with precision flight demonstration. 

While accidents can happen anywhere, in some places it’s a foregone conclusion having an accident there’s worse.  The Dayton air show is one such place as it can be expected to have more knowledge about such things, and the same is the case for precision teams.  The gift of flight was given to humanity and it needs the utmost respect from everyone. 

Reaching the stars was once only a dream. Airplane 

Aviation Trail Began….

           Dover 59 Copy

As stated May 29, there’s a “creation” called the Aviation Heritage Area.  It includes the Air and Space Museum.  The initial intent of Aviation Trail was to “save” what things could be “saved” that were in Dayton relative to inventing the airplane.  Although space exploration is a logical end result of that, it isn’t a primary concern of the Trail. 

The Trail’s starting point was what was “in Dayton.”  That Air and Space Museum is upstate.  Not even Huffman Prairie was (or is) actually “in Dayton,” but it’s at least in the immediate area and, of course, very relative to the Wright Brothers themselves.  Places like Kitty Hawk are important to the story, but they are not “in Dayton” or even near. 

It was mistakenly believed by many for many years that all things of any importance relative to the invention were in fact distributed to museums, etc.  Additionally, locally a “negative reputation” descended on the area which persists even today even though the Park Service has been there for decades and in spite of things like names being changed. 

Eventually it was learned by some younger private citizens with the means to start something that there were valuable things that were still “in Dayton.”  Some have died by now but they did what they could to salvage what was there.  A book exists that lists more than what is presented in what travel leaflets there are.  And, that’s story in itself.

Hopefully everyone’s Father’s Day was nice.Rainbow 

Notes On Aviation Trail National Landmarks

      Dover 296a

As stated earlier, not everything on the Aviation Trail is considered a National Landmark.  Indeed, very little of it falls into that classification.  At the last “look around” only five of the Trail sites were Landmarks, with hopes of some others.  (Further there are Landmarks in the area not related to aviation, like the Native American SunWatch.) 

The bicycle shop, of course, is the #1 Landmark; saving it started the deal decades ago.  If someone has limited time and can’t see even all of the Landmarks, while interesting and certainly notable, places like the Wright Oakwood home might be (logically) skipped in preference to the “spot on the ground” (Huffman Prairie) and the Wright’s airplane.

The airplane and the spot on the ground are the reasons to visit.  Given the physical locations of those and the shop (all three) that’s about a two-day leisurely visit for any person with the idea of utilizing a long weekend or people with a wish to spend part of a vacation somewhere else.  A school project is another matter.  One day isn’t enough. 

It’s not the intention here to tell anyone where to go.  A little suggesting, however, is not that out of line.  From the viewpoint of a native to the area, although flight’s a mechanical thing, the idea is rather awesome.  There are a number of good lessons in the story of the Wrights and any merit more exploring, but flight was the earth changing.

Some inventions are profound.Coffee cup 

Old Folks’ Home “Views” … (Why ATI)

         Dover 298 - Copy

The place underfoot supposedly has a “view” (something the residents are supposed to enjoy seeing).  If one stands in front of the place, straight ahead is the top parts of the string of old houses across the street.  To the right some more houses sit with backside there for viewing.  They are not “lovely homes” although not what’s classed “trashy.” 

Then there’s the side to the left.  (That’s supposed to be the view.)  It’s a fairly big river that is always a muddy brown with ripples that show that it’s flowing.  In what’s sort of the left front corner of the view is a bridge that the government plans to tear down, and it does look rather beat up.  There’s constant traffic, often trucks, on it. 

Due left (across the river) there’s a coal yard (a barge’s usually there, too) and often a freight train goes snaking past the area a bit more distant.  It’s all to be ignored, since what one is supposed to enjoy is the side of a ridge that’s to the right and covered with (distant) trees and a shiny skyline (above the left) that is Cincinnati, Ohio.

While some of this has been said before now, it merits the repeat to explain that nothing in sight suggests uplifting viewing nor what some call worthwhile activities.  Elderly means still alive, and while some are happy to just exist, life isn’t much without doing something worthwhile.  Enter some kind of volunteering (like support Aviation Trail). 

Seems like life should have a purpose.Coffee cup 

More On Aviation Trail … (Good Topic)

       A Dover Wright 5 - Copy

Since the topic’s been unearthed, a few more words on this matter called Aviation Trail (like maybe some explanations about what it is for people who have no idea) would seem a timely and sensible thing.  Aviation Trail is part of (and the foundation of) a scatter-site U.S. National Park.  The park system doesn’t include all identified trail sites. 

The trail sites are more a collection rather than a single path to follow or series.  The idea is, the sites that are listed have been clearly identified as associated with the Wright Brothers in some way (not necessarily aviation).  A person should look through the list and, based on how much time he/she has, choose the sites of the most interest. 

Regardless of the path chosen, it’s essential to start the whole thing with a visit to the bicycle shop and immediate area for information and direction, especially if visitors from somewhere else as the sites are widely scattered.  If time is limited, one might aim to just visit the Landmarks rather than take in things in the vicinity of the shop. 

There is also another related (but different) thing called the Aviation Heritage Area.  It’s a large chunk of western Ohio on maps that includes the Air and Space Museum, which might be of special interest to some.  The Heritage Area’s collection of sites, of course, includes the National Park Service.  Getting what’s covered all straight’s needed. 

It’s hoped Memorial Day was nice for all.Auto