Explanation Of Topic Wanderings….

The day’s topic (i.e., this week’s topic) started out to be Aviation Trail, Inc.  Not only is there stuff like some new approaches to communications there, a little review of what some dedicated “grassroots” people can do is always worthwhile.  Surprisingly, there are people who should know about ATI but, even after the more than 35 years of the organization’s existence, they don’t.

“Plant a tree for Earth day” came up somewhere in recent ATI/National Park Service information (exactly where is now lost in the mists).  The activity was scheduled for April 25 at the Wright Memorial (WPAFB).  It was a “collaborative” activity hosted by a (local) part of the air force that actually made it to somewhere in the local media news reports. That can happen but often doesn’t.

While discussing ATI made sense, incoming notifications said last week’s topic, some rather random comments about life in the old folks’ home underfoot, was still finding interested people as of Saturday.  If that truly interests people, it should be a frequent topic.  It is a somewhat “different” way of living, as is living in a monastery, dormitory, mountain cabin or at a battlefront.

The “House In The City,” the forerunner of this literary masterpiece, was literally an ordinary six room, two story house (actually turn of the 20th century mail order house) built like a big squarish cube in an ordinary, average income area of an average-sized city.  The matter came into existence because by then nearly half the area’s population was growing up in suburban areas.

Some things can be done any time.  🙂

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Some Thoughts About Bridges

A bridge joins two things, commonly the two sides of a river.  Bridges join other things, too, and sometimes neither the bridge nor the two things joined are material things.  Regardless of what’s joined to what, the whole point of a bridge is an encouragement if not the actual establishment of interaction.  And, said interaction would, logically, be a matter of some profitability or other value.

One can imagine the likes of an exceptionally able-bodied per-historic man seeing something of interest across a river, perhaps seeing animals swimming across it, and figuring out how to cross it for a better look himself.  If it be worth going back and forth, it would only make sense to find a way to just walk there, especially if it would be of benefit for others to likewise go back and forth.

Regardless of how they came to be in the mists of time, today bridges exist.  Some are pretty, a lovely sight worth painting.  Some are strictly utilitarian and not particularly uplifting, never mind enchanting.  Regardless of the view, some kind of engineering mind beyond much of humanity figured it out for the rest of humanity quite likely on the order of either business interests or politicians.

Given motor boats and helicopters, today bridges are not particularly an extra-ordinary necessity if one discounts the likes of mass crossings.  The one almost underfoot might be labelled “necessary” as there’s endless traffic on it, much of it tractor-trailer trucks some of which probably haul the U.S. mail for or after cancellation.  It’s used.  It’s also a complicated eyesore permanently in view….

Discomfort can be a part of living.  😦

Government Shut Down

Contrary to a lot of evidence, the “big news” recently was the partial government shut down.  It’s hard to believe some sources don’t think that’s particularly important.  While admittedly not all of the government was included, common sense says that since the government is funded by citizens’ tax money, whatever there is of it should be a real need.  If it’s possible to just shut it down, it isn’t too needed.

That point mentioned, at least one place in the area immediately underfoot was part of the shut down, reportedly.  It should not have the economic impact on the surrounding community that some other places might have, as (reportedly) that office will be closed permanently next year.  Nonetheless, for the moment businesses that provide services for government employees should expect much less business.

The fact that places like the Statue of Liberty have been affected is, of course, notable in general; but, the main interest here is how will the shut down (regarding the national parks) affect the places and things of concern to Aviation Trail?  The air force museum, which is an allied site, did close; but, what of the ATI related Landmark sites is, was and will be closed isn’t clear from what information could be found.

Someone can, say, go look at the outside of the bicycle shop and the surrounding area any time, but going inside and hearing a presentation from a park ranger is more truly exploring the matter.  Something like Woodland cemetery should be operating on their regular hours, so paying one’s respects at the Wrights’ grave sites should be possible; but, that’s not getting much of an idea about inventing airplanes.

How long something lasts can be important.  🙂

Cold Weather At The Old Folks’ Home

Born and bred in the Northlands doesn’t mean someone must stay in the snow/ice belt, but people do.  Children, of course, need to stay with parents, and children account for a hefty percentage of the population.  Adult population is another matter.  Many stay for the sake of a job and a measure of income, especially if around what’s called “middle-age.”  Only a few are in a good position to leave, which means dealing with the weather.

Zero and sub-zero temperatures (Fahrenheit) are obviously more likely the farther north one goes (or for that matter south in the southern hemisphere).  The area underfoot is In the more temperate area, and “zero” only happen sometimes (right now underfoot).  Since it only happens sometimes, and since the people in an old folks’ home often do not do much like hold down a job, they are among those who often aren’t well prepared.

There’s less going places (never mind hanging around outside congregating regardless of nice selling points like a lovely view) and more of a rush to get in if there’s some need to go out.  And, that “getting in” includes getting beyond the halls, which, especially near the entrances, aren’t much warmer than the outdoors.  Chilly halls also put a damper on necessities, like going to a laundry room or even getting some snacks from machines.

There can be a serious strain on the heating system if it is getting a little old, but if it is a big building there is less chance of something like pipes freezing up or electricity being knocked out for an extended period (especially when a place has a back-up generator). Reasonable older people also try to avoid driving if roadways are bad, so getting things like food or making it to things like doctor’s appointments are very common problems.

To be remembered:  snow covers a lot of dirt.  🙂

Christmas Cincinnati! …??

Cincinnati is still known to some as “The Queen City of The West” even though it is no longer in “The West.”  (After 1803 the area wasn’t so much “The West” anymore, although it was still west of Boston, New York, Washington, D.C, etc.)  Electric light bulb stuff blossomed into use later, and an electric gizmo sits at the edge of downtown Cincinnati to announce “Cincinnati” that is seemingly suited for an earlier time.

The “gizmo” is a huge (much larger than ordinary houses) series of lights that spell out the word “Cincinnati.”  It sits relatively close to the north bank of the Ohio river and presents itself mostly in a sort of southwest direction so that it would be a word to be seen by up-river boat traffic rather than people downtown or on the south bank.  The thing is, there is ordinarily very little boat traffic on the river up or down.

One can well imagine a time before cars and planes were common when shipping did heavily use the river.  People on a relatively long haul on the river might seriously appreciate such a sign off in the distance.  There are people around who can see it, such as on the south bank, but that’s far from the same thing.  It’s brightly there every night, and they are people who really don’t need it as a sign a trip’s over.

Sometimes the colors of the lights are changed, like at times the display has been done in red, white and blue.  Well, it’s Christmas time and the message sent downstream these days has been done in red and green.  It’s very cheery and fitting, but it does seem like it would go best with the whole expression Queen City of The West, which, as sadly noted, doesn’t have the impact it once did unless one’s in Boston, etc.

It’s sad when beautiful things lose out.  😦

Grandpa’s Outhouse … (Old Folks’ Home Note)

      Sign

Grandpa’s outhouse was different, a sort of addenda to the place.  The house had indoor plumbing; it even had outdoor plumbing.  In that space where an ordinary detached garage would have sat, a previous owner had made it a cement-like building to allow for minor metal work.  Inside was a sink with running water, a small fire pit and a window area. 

One could live in that “garage,” which was spacious enough for two cars and then some, and grandpa sometimes did.  It was a house that had up to five women at times and the one bathroom of an ordinary house.  He would sleep there, then go in the house for meals and then go off to visit friends or build something leaving the house part to the women. 

While it had a sink, it was all the plumbing there.  There was, however, an outhouse “bathroom” in a side area, which may have been for a worker or such in the once upon a time when decorator lamps were built there.  Regardless, it was rather unexpectedly there, and one day, maybe 70 years ago grandma thoughtfully said, if there was a need, use it. 

For future reference, every city-bred kid needs a visit to such a thing at least once.  The old folks’ home underfoot decided to revamp (or something) the plumbing.  Water shut off to the entire building runs eleven hours on Wednesdays presently.  And, “making do” to an extent is quite like an experience with the outhouse, if one’s unable to leave. 

It always helps to have background. Thumbs up 

Old Folks’ Home “Views” … (Why ATI)

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The place underfoot supposedly has a “view” (something the residents are supposed to enjoy seeing).  If one stands in front of the place, straight ahead is the top parts of the string of old houses across the street.  To the right some more houses sit with backside there for viewing.  They are not “lovely homes” although not what’s classed “trashy.” 

Then there’s the side to the left.  (That’s supposed to be the view.)  It’s a fairly big river that is always a muddy brown with ripples that show that it’s flowing.  In what’s sort of the left front corner of the view is a bridge that the government plans to tear down, and it does look rather beat up.  There’s constant traffic, often trucks, on it. 

Due left (across the river) there’s a coal yard (a barge’s usually there, too) and often a freight train goes snaking past the area a bit more distant.  It’s all to be ignored, since what one is supposed to enjoy is the side of a ridge that’s to the right and covered with (distant) trees and a shiny skyline (above the left) that is Cincinnati, Ohio.

While some of this has been said before now, it merits the repeat to explain that nothing in sight suggests uplifting viewing nor what some call worthwhile activities.  Elderly means still alive, and while some are happy to just exist, life isn’t much without doing something worthwhile.  Enter some kind of volunteering (like support Aviation Trail). 

Seems like life should have a purpose.Coffee cup