ATI Newsletter: A Different Christmas Event

It seems things have changed with the Aviation Trail news.  It used to be that every so often (like quarterly) a four page report came.  Now one page comes once a week.  This week’s was read.  There’s a Christmas-y thing in it.  Just incidentally, the newsletter has quite a bit in it, but it’s just not the same.  One sheet is not like opening a magazine even if it’s only four pages and not slick.

One big news of the week is, of course, the wreath-laying ceremony come this Friday to commemorate the December 17, 1903, flight at Kittyhawk by the Wrights.  A fly-over is planned and refreshments are to be had (time:  10:10 – 10:35 a.m.).  It’s open to the public and hosted by Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park.  It’s called The First Flight Ceremony and is a regular event.

In addition, a dinner is planned for December 16, the annual First Flight Dinner, to honor the Wrights, and it’s also a commemoration for the 100th anniversary of McCook Field.  McCook Field was in operation from 1917 to 1927 and had that rather famous and clever big hangar sign saying, “This field is small – use it all.”  It was named for Civil War General Alexander McDowell McCook.

The dinner is the time of the annual Trailblazer Award, which this year goes to what eventually came into being (these days) from McCook Field.  The dinner features a “re-enactment” (if one wants to call it that) of the 1903 Wrights Christmas dinner, including turkey and stuffing, whipped potatoes, green beans, cranberry sauce, spice cake and other goodies as well as coffee and tea.

Christmas events can be many things.  🙂

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Thanksgiving Time … (Old Folk’s Home)

A suitable thing here would be a picture of a harvest feast and eloquent thoughts about such matters; but, as has been noted, getting pictures in place is a rather complicated accomplishment.  Eloquent thoughts aren’t too easy to come by, either.  The pictures are available, including one of a Pilgrim Thanksgiving and crop displays; thoughts might also be found. However….

As some folks might be interested in holiday thoughts at an old folks’ home (aka senior retirement community), what’s here are some pertinent thoughts.  These are applicable to other holidays as well, such as Christmas; but, that’s not a holiday for everyone.  Up in Dayton (Ohio) a feast meant for all comers was first established decades ago by a well-to-do Jewish merchant.

In some places a gathering of residents is not too important.  Able-bodied people go to chosen places.  If the places have people who don’t get around well, a festive gathering can make life a little nicer.  The term “senior retirement community” offers a clue as to what’s at hand but not always.  The place underfoot is called that but dinners are big deals, especially holiday.

The real places for special dinners to be arranged are places like battlefronts, nursing homes, homeless shelters and perhaps some jails.  Setting one up in a church is not a bad idea, but it doesn’t really suit universal holidays (like Thanksgiving), nor does it do anything for people who have slipped from the mainstream ideas of society, the best reason for having one.

May everyone have a good Thanksgiving. 🙂

Testing, Testing

If this works, we may be back in some action here soon.

Net result, however, can’t be determined for a good while.

The best to everyone over the holiday and beyond, of course.

Not only Dayton’s county fair over the Labor Day holiday be gone this year, but also a neat mention of it.  (Sigh)

Vitamin E? … A Tribute, Legacy, Memory….

       Sign

Her legal name was Marceile, but she was called Sally, she once said.  The relationship probably started out with her husband using his “after office hours” sign painting skill for parental needs.  In short, it wasn’t direct initially, just relative and relative.  That lasted some years and of course extended beyond business since it be after hours. 

Being in the same church and somewhat shopping in the same shops contributed to the development of things, as did the living in the same general neighborhood for decades.  What really got things going was years later after both husband and one parent had died.  That was mutual employment in an office where the two jobs were an aisle from each other. 

While the job arrangement didn’t really last long, she was good enough to stay loosely in touch and at critical times was around for at least some good advice.  Amid the advice (and other bits of help) was an insistence on the value of vitamin E, without really saying what it was.  Another was bottled water (city’s was amid the best in the country). 

Sally died many years ago.  The bottled drinking water had reason for use soon after the insistence, as a factory was in a fire and chemicals leaked into the aquifer.  Water in the apartment building is full of crud.  Distilled water’s what’s used.  A bottle of vitamin E sits on a shelf.  It’s breakfast “enhancement” for whatever that might provide. 

Lives of others can be helped in many ways. Plate 

Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park Ohio

       A Dover Wright 5 - Copy

“Dayton Aviation Heritage National Park” is a bit of wordy description to identify the handful of places related some way to the Wright Brothers under the direction of the U.S. National Park Service.  While that does rather say it all, recently it’s such a few places that it probably should be noted that the superintendent also covered another park. 

The superintendent made local news this past week as he is retiring.  Given the plans afoot to include the factory of the Wrights, he seemed to see a bright and growing future, but whether that might soon include purely local authority rather than one also covering a place on the other side of the state wasn’t clear (or else no one bothered to ask). 

At present, since the government authority could cover two parks, Dayton Aviation Heritage stuff is obviously a small part of the U.S. government’s interests.  For that matter, it’s not even a big part of Dayton’s interests for many of the people.  But, it’s important for understanding of what the Wrights actually did.  It’s a good piece of history. 

Decades have passed since this “salvage operation” started out, and not only are some of the promoters old, some have died off already (as has been mentioned).  Materially that bright and growing future won’t be seen by some; and, it’s quite possible it won’t develop as expected.  Nonetheless, diehards will likely continue because it’s good history. 

Doing something worthwhile uplifts the spirit. Thumbs up 

Montgomery County Fair – End Of An Era

     Special 21

Since food’s essential to life, by definition agricultural “fairs” are important events.  Improvements resulting from those competitions are meaningful.  Fairs, however, aren’t big everywhere.  Possibly the best place for such would be mid-sized cities surrounded by rural areas.  Regionally, a farmer doesn’t have much market if a whole area’s rural. 

It made sense to set fairgrounds near towns.  In time some places, such as Dayton, Ohio, towns grew around fair sites until the fairgrounds were almost in the downtown area, an ever-present concrete reminder of life’s fundamentals.  It was easy to go to the fair, and it was a big fair bringing some people from more distant areas to the competitions. 

For some, for many decades, Labor Day weekend was a county fair time in Dayton (Montgomery county).  And, it was also the second competition for some after a more localized one where they lived.  After 165 years the land will have some other uses, like education and medicine, and the fair will be at the outskirts of town again, a loss to city folks. 

The last fair near downtown was held already, although the holiday is nearly two months away.  And those people going downtown to the fair for decades will be gone as well soon enough.  Once that happens it will decidedly be the end of that era in that area, a world of the past beyond even the memories of the people.  Maybe it will be a better time. 

Cemeteries and books have many old tales. School 

Editorial Gripe — Today’s Aviation, ATI Note

      A Dover Wright 1a

This little space was never meant to be a bunch of endless rambling of personal opinion, but a comment (now and then) should be okay.  This was meant to be a place where people found informative and interesting stuff about a few things around the immediate area of the “author.”  Personal stuff now limits physical roaming but the principle is valid. 

The humble (?) city of Dayton, the birthplace of aviation, the “place” of Aviation Trail and a sometimes reference in this little place, tries to have an annual air show.  That may not be the biggest or the finest in the country (or in the world), but it could be considered a very special show even if it is at the “barely a port” municipal airport. 

The Dayton air show should be nearly perfect.  This year’s show was again marred by an accident.  Luckily, no one was killed, but it was a “Thunderbirds’ accident” and canceled two days of that headline act.  It’s not guaranteed that a show will include either the Navy’s Blue Angels or the Air Force Thunderbirds with precision flight demonstration. 

While accidents can happen anywhere, in some places it’s a foregone conclusion having an accident there’s worse.  The Dayton air show is one such place as it can be expected to have more knowledge about such things, and the same is the case for precision teams.  The gift of flight was given to humanity and it needs the utmost respect from everyone. 

Reaching the stars was once only a dream. Airplane