Explanation Of Topic Wanderings….

The day’s topic (i.e., this week’s topic) started out to be Aviation Trail, Inc.  Not only is there stuff like some new approaches to communications there, a little review of what some dedicated “grassroots” people can do is always worthwhile.  Surprisingly, there are people who should know about ATI but, even after the more than 35 years of the organization’s existence, they don’t.

“Plant a tree for Earth day” came up somewhere in recent ATI/National Park Service information (exactly where is now lost in the mists).  The activity was scheduled for April 25 at the Wright Memorial (WPAFB).  It was a “collaborative” activity hosted by a (local) part of the air force that actually made it to somewhere in the local media news reports. That can happen but often doesn’t.

While discussing ATI made sense, incoming notifications said last week’s topic, some rather random comments about life in the old folks’ home underfoot, was still finding interested people as of Saturday.  If that truly interests people, it should be a frequent topic.  It is a somewhat “different” way of living, as is living in a monastery, dormitory, mountain cabin or at a battlefront.

The “House In The City,” the forerunner of this literary masterpiece, was literally an ordinary six room, two story house (actually turn of the 20th century mail order house) built like a big squarish cube in an ordinary, average income area of an average-sized city.  The matter came into existence because by then nearly half the area’s population was growing up in suburban areas.

Some things can be done any time.  🙂

Advertisements

What’s In A Name?

The legal name herewith involved is considered a Hungarian word or trade name.  The root word it came from, however, is Slovak, evidently picked up for some reason many hundreds of years ago.  An experience has been, at least in the area underfoot, that only a Hungarian (or someone of Hungarian descent) identifies it as Hungarian.  The usual guess is Greek.

Latin Americans on the other hand commonly identify the name as Spanish, and there is a Spanish branch that was created at least 500 years ago.  Berliners or thereabouts might identify it as a Germanic name imported at some time.  And, since the root word is Slovak, various Slavic peoples might suspect it as Slavic related, just not their particular language.

It’s definitely a military-related name since, so far, three coats-of-arms have been found, one each for the Spanish, German and Hungarian.  In basic translation it’s not “glorious” like “king” or practical like “miller” but is rather fear-creating and over-powering.  While It can be translated and isn’t common, it’s obviously wide-spread so generally can be left as is ordinarily.

A name is first an identity for the spark of life to which it’s attached.  A parent looks at a child and gives it a first name that’s rather how the parent wants him/her to appear to be and by which he/she is distinguished from others with the same surname.  The surname already has an image and maybe heritage the kid should mirror.  At least it should be known if possible.

The opinions of others aren’t identities.  🙂

Government Shut Down

Contrary to a lot of evidence, the “big news” recently was the partial government shut down.  It’s hard to believe some sources don’t think that’s particularly important.  While admittedly not all of the government was included, common sense says that since the government is funded by citizens’ tax money, whatever there is of it should be a real need.  If it’s possible to just shut it down, it isn’t too needed.

That point mentioned, at least one place in the area immediately underfoot was part of the shut down, reportedly.  It should not have the economic impact on the surrounding community that some other places might have, as (reportedly) that office will be closed permanently next year.  Nonetheless, for the moment businesses that provide services for government employees should expect much less business.

The fact that places like the Statue of Liberty have been affected is, of course, notable in general; but, the main interest here is how will the shut down (regarding the national parks) affect the places and things of concern to Aviation Trail?  The air force museum, which is an allied site, did close; but, what of the ATI related Landmark sites is, was and will be closed isn’t clear from what information could be found.

Someone can, say, go look at the outside of the bicycle shop and the surrounding area any time, but going inside and hearing a presentation from a park ranger is more truly exploring the matter.  Something like Woodland cemetery should be operating on their regular hours, so paying one’s respects at the Wrights’ grave sites should be possible; but, that’s not getting much of an idea about inventing airplanes.

How long something lasts can be important.  🙂

ATI Newsletter: A Different Christmas Event

It seems things have changed with the Aviation Trail news.  It used to be that every so often (like quarterly) a four page report came.  Now one page comes once a week.  This week’s was read.  There’s a Christmas-y thing in it.  Just incidentally, the newsletter has quite a bit in it, but it’s just not the same.  One sheet is not like opening a magazine even if it’s only four pages and not slick.

One big news of the week is, of course, the wreath-laying ceremony come this Friday to commemorate the December 17, 1903, flight at Kittyhawk by the Wrights.  A fly-over is planned and refreshments are to be had (time:  10:10 – 10:35 a.m.).  It’s open to the public and hosted by Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park.  It’s called The First Flight Ceremony and is a regular event.

In addition, a dinner is planned for December 16, the annual First Flight Dinner, to honor the Wrights, and it’s also a commemoration for the 100th anniversary of McCook Field.  McCook Field was in operation from 1917 to 1927 and had that rather famous and clever big hangar sign saying, “This field is small – use it all.”  It was named for Civil War General Alexander McDowell McCook.

The dinner is the time of the annual Trailblazer Award, which this year goes to what eventually came into being (these days) from McCook Field.  The dinner features a “re-enactment” (if one wants to call it that) of the 1903 Wrights Christmas dinner, including turkey and stuffing, whipped potatoes, green beans, cranberry sauce, spice cake and other goodies as well as coffee and tea.

Christmas events can be many things.  🙂

Thanksgiving Time … (Old Folk’s Home)

A suitable thing here would be a picture of a harvest feast and eloquent thoughts about such matters; but, as has been noted, getting pictures in place is a rather complicated accomplishment.  Eloquent thoughts aren’t too easy to come by, either.  The pictures are available, including one of a Pilgrim Thanksgiving and crop displays; thoughts might also be found. However….

As some folks might be interested in holiday thoughts at an old folks’ home (aka senior retirement community), what’s here are some pertinent thoughts.  These are applicable to other holidays as well, such as Christmas; but, that’s not a holiday for everyone.  Up in Dayton (Ohio) a feast meant for all comers was first established decades ago by a well-to-do Jewish merchant.

In some places a gathering of residents is not too important.  Able-bodied people go to chosen places.  If the places have people who don’t get around well, a festive gathering can make life a little nicer.  The term “senior retirement community” offers a clue as to what’s at hand but not always.  The place underfoot is called that but dinners are big deals, especially holiday.

The real places for special dinners to be arranged are places like battlefronts, nursing homes, homeless shelters and perhaps some jails.  Setting one up in a church is not a bad idea, but it doesn’t really suit universal holidays (like Thanksgiving), nor does it do anything for people who have slipped from the mainstream ideas of society, the best reason for having one.

May everyone have a good Thanksgiving. 🙂

Testing, Testing

If this works, we may be back in some action here soon.

Net result, however, can’t be determined for a good while.

The best to everyone over the holiday and beyond, of course.

Not only Dayton’s county fair over the Labor Day holiday be gone this year, but also a neat mention of it.  (Sigh)

Vitamin E? … A Tribute, Legacy, Memory….

       Sign

Her legal name was Marceile, but she was called Sally, she once said.  The relationship probably started out with her husband using his “after office hours” sign painting skill for parental needs.  In short, it wasn’t direct initially, just relative and relative.  That lasted some years and of course extended beyond business since it be after hours. 

Being in the same church and somewhat shopping in the same shops contributed to the development of things, as did the living in the same general neighborhood for decades.  What really got things going was years later after both husband and one parent had died.  That was mutual employment in an office where the two jobs were an aisle from each other. 

While the job arrangement didn’t really last long, she was good enough to stay loosely in touch and at critical times was around for at least some good advice.  Amid the advice (and other bits of help) was an insistence on the value of vitamin E, without really saying what it was.  Another was bottled water (city’s was amid the best in the country). 

Sally died many years ago.  The bottled drinking water had reason for use soon after the insistence, as a factory was in a fire and chemicals leaked into the aquifer.  Water in the apartment building is full of crud.  Distilled water’s what’s used.  A bottle of vitamin E sits on a shelf.  It’s breakfast “enhancement” for whatever that might provide. 

Lives of others can be helped in many ways. Plate