So, It’s Spring In The Northlands

      Dover 204a

In the area underfoot, daffodils tend to grow and bloom as spring is about to start.  It is usually before the actual start of spring by some days.  Then, frequently, it gets a bit colder (like freezing) and rainy.  The flowers usually get beaten down.  It’s always so sad seeing that.  It does happen that they aren’t completely gone, which is nice. 

At the place underfoot, there is a drop of an entire floor near the main doors, maybe ten feet away, a basement entry for staff.  Several items sit in the space, a tree as well the daffodils; they are hard to miss.  At The House in the City they were just a small clump near the quince bush for more than thirty years basking in afternoon spring sun. 

The ones at the “current house” are not a bright yellow as those of the past were and are in an out of the way shaded spot, but they still bring a fond smile and happy thoughts when considered.  If they, too, last a generation and more doing nothing but quietly living as possible, they will be another everyday sign of the marvelousness of creation.   

There are negative connotations with that family of plants along with positive ones.  And, there are many “signs that spring is here” including other blooming.  Much is made of some of it.  Well, at both places mentioned, the daffodils were planted by someone else.  So, people long gone left a message for those who came by later:  new life is here. 

Odd things can make a house a home.Coffee cup 

“The Rust Belt” You Say?

      Dover 20a

Although not precisely the same thing, what today is named “The Rust Belt” is pretty much what more properly would be called “The Great Lakes Region.” In days long past, it was the industrial heartland of the United States.  Because of the lakes, it’s a special place on earth apart from recent industrial history and invention developed thereabouts. 

The oldest of today’s people lived through a sort of glory era that started ending after World War II.  With it, many people kept hoping things would get better but life, times and the world changes things.  It is pretty clear that the factory jobs that brought the mountain folks and Europeans (in earlier days) are gone.  Today hopes are different. 

While it is true that “end of an era” if one wants to call that such caused many people (and businesses, too) to find homes elsewhere, millions of people still live in the Rust Belt.  For many, for various reasons, it wasn’t practical, sensible or reasonable to leave.  They look to things like new ideas, restorations and renovations.  Some is good. 

Technology (inventiveness) may be centered elsewhere these days, but it is still a little too soon to “write off” the Great Lakes area and the surrounding region.  There’s some effort and there are young people still there.  It will be different from the past.  And, it would be good if it were called “The Great Lakes Region” (or something similar). 

One must think positive to do something.Fingers crossed 

High Time Of Changes … (Ides Of March)

      Dover 30b Monet - Copy

Winter’s drifting into Spring (unless one’s somewhere like New Zealand where it’s the reverse).  Clock’s hands should have been shoved ahead an hour (unless one’s someplace not concerned about other people’s hours).  Dietary adjustment has fallen into place for some millions of people at least temporarily (unless one’s a nonbeliever).  Change it is. 

Perhaps the weather had something to do with the events in ancient Rome that gave us the “Ides of March” warning.  It was a bit unusual in the area underfoot in that winter has snow, but there really wasn’t any worth mention.  It would have been much if all the rain had been snow.  Although it was warmish, people seemed to act as if it were bad out. 

These days one could “beware the Ides of March” because of the clock changing business.  That should be about when it really kicks into play for everyday life.  And, thus comes disoriented people a little disorganized about what’s what today, especially if the mind is on what’s to be eaten for lunch, which is now an hour later than it was last week. 

The trees in front of the place underfoot were topped with white blossoms creating a different atmosphere, which does look lovely while saying “winter’s gone”; but, the changes that are man-made at this time are enough to overshadow at least in part the only “legitimate” (natural world) change taking place.  So, how to get rid of the unnatural ones? 

Some things are hopeless.Coffee cup 

Lenten Thoughts

      Dover 202a cut top and bottom

“…Dust thou art….” it was said Wednesday.  Well “Adam” and “Eve” by extension may have been dust to start with, but a look at the way things go now shows two living entities in merger (together) becoming a single living “thou” existing thereafter.  Of course, if the “thou” stops living there’s the common state of decomposition or a turning to dust. 

There is no intent here to go into a Biblical or religious hassle, but when something clearly isn’t dust (although it may very well be chemical elements) to begin with, it’s an erroneous premise even if the difference’s some electrical energy that’s there at the start.  There is no “thou” sans both the elements and the energy together in one being. 

Not only is the “starting point” with living entities, but living things (animal and plant as well as human) have the natural power to turn dead things (most food is dead, just not decomposed) into a living thing (themselves).  That is much more than is implied in that standard introduction to Lent.  Possibly some revision is needed in the wording.

One big reason things die is that the world around them or even in them stops supporting them.  Simple example:  with something like a fire, smoke can overwhelm the oxygen.  No oxygen and air breathing creatures die because the way the creature functions is with oxygen.  It isn’t necessarily a punishment for a “thou” to die, if it’s no environment. 

“Heady” thoughts can be hard to express.Alien